Category: Appdapted Apps


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Pic-A-Boo is a free app by Pic-A-Boo Baby that offers a fun twist on peek-a-boo. At first glance this app is inline with other similar peek-a-boo apps out there like the Peek-a-Boo series by Night & Day Studios. The premise of Pic-A-Boo is simple, you tap on the screen and you reveal the object hiding behind the hands, barn door, blanket, or doll house.

 

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The game comes free with Cute Animals and Happy Robots to play pic-a-boo with. The remaining pictures are available as a in-app purchase of $1.99 and include over 40   images in 6 different sets of fun peekaboo games including farm and zoo animals with real sounds, illustrated eggs in a variety of uniforms, happy robots, illustrated animals and sweet stars.

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The best part of the app, which is included as part of the in-app purchases, is the ability to import your own and create your own “Boos”. With the ability to import your own pictures you are free to change it up a bit and target pronouns by adding pictures of yourself , family members, and the child as well as working on things like verbs or articulation.

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The ability to record your voice is somewhat limited as you are only able to record the sound that plays each time the object that is hiding is revealed which could be fun for younger children.

Pictured below are some examples of some  CVC words to play a  fun game of Pic-A-Boo!!

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Pic-A-Boo is available for iPad

 

20130328-110728.jpgKids Vehicles 1: Interactive Fire Truck, $1.99, is a 3D interactive App by 22 learn available for iPad and iPhone. It similar to other interactive apps out there as you are able to drive the truck, put out fires, and learn about fire truck vocabulary. The one twist with this app is the augmented reality feature which allows you to virtually drive the fire truck around in your environment. This of course opens lots of doors for use in speech therapy!

This pictures show the fire rescue mini game:

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The next thing you want to do is set up your environment to use with the augmented reality. In this example we were driving around and searching for the fire. It was hidden around the room. On chairs, under tables, and in lots of other silly places. (The disclaimer here obviously is to make sure you are working with a client that understands fire safety.) We then worked on his sentence structure as he is one of those kiddos that tends to leave out “the”, “is”, and “a/an” in his sentences. He had to hide the fire and then explain to me over our walkie talkies exactly where it was.20130328-110944.jpg

Additional activities can include:

  1. Targeting articulation by hiding cards around the room that the child needs to “rescue”
  2. Targeting following directions and have the child follow 1-2 step directions i.e., drive to the table then make a left.
  3. Targeting narrative skills by having the child tell the story about how the saved the day.

Be creative and have fun!

Please feel free to comment on any other ideas you have for using this app 🙂

 

 

 

Speech Therapy on the Fly

Sorry for the delay between posts! I figured the last week of February would be as good a time as any for my first post of 2013, so without further ado here is:  Speech Therapy on the Fly

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The use of apps have made the lives of speech-language pathologists and special educators around the world much easier. Well unless you have a parent hand you an iPad and say please program my child’s AAC app, depending on who you are you might run in the other direction! New apps are released daily and it’s almost impossible to keep track of them, heck it’s almost impossible to keep track of the apps I have on my iPad. We really need something better than a “folder” that holds only 20 apps don’t you think ?? Anyway let me get to the point of this post! I have been using a few apps lately that allow me to create on the fly and go with the flow of  some of my moody clients or Appdapt with another app or to a pen and paper type program. Here are 3  great examples:

Puppet Pals HD Directors Pass  $2.99 in the App store available for iPhone and iPad

Puppet Pals as been around a while and there is actually a Puppet Pals 2 that came out recently, however I still prefer the first version because you are able to use your whole body in the scene whereas Puppet Pals 2 you are only capable of using your head.  So with this app you can quickly add a background scene and place virtually any characters in your scene.  You then record your scene by moving your character around as the app records your voice and your character’s movements. You can see by the picture below  that my client is really into dinosaur and enjoyed making the dinosaur eat him.

Director's Pass allows you to take pictures from your photo roll and narrate a "play" about them.

Director’s Pass allows you to take pictures from your photo roll and narrate a “play” about them.

PicCollage – free for iPhone and iPad

PicCollage is a fabulous app that has lots of applications for therapy. The purpose of this app is to create collages using pictures from your camera roll and the web.  The web search on this app is one of the most useful features you can literally add anything that comes to a client’s mind and instantly crop and add it to the collage.

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The picture above is the start screen when opening PicCollage. You can see the options included which are: capturing a picture, adding a photo, photo from web, adding text, and adding stickers. Some stickers like hats or sunglasses are free but most you have to purchase. I quickly started using this app to pair with other apps. For example I have been using Rainbow Sentences by Mobile Education Store to focus on sentence structure with some of my clients. While using the Rainbow Sentences App I take screenshots of some of the sentences my clients were successful with and then use the screenshots in PicCollage. Here is an example:

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 As you can see the screen shot is the background image from Rainbow Sentences. I took a picture of my client, cropped her body out and inserted it into the collage. I then searched for roller skates and a helmet having my client request the type that she wanted. These were then cropped and placed on the picture to give the illusion that she is wearing skates and a helmet. Finally I searched for word bubbles and inserted that in as well with the text.  So I was able to seamlessly transition to another activity but still working on the previous goals all while keeping my client motivated by having her personalize the picture.

Another use for PicCollage is with my older clients that I am using Nanci Bell’s  Verbalizing and Visualizing. If you are unfamiliar with the program I recommend that you check it out. It focuses on having children create a whole image or a “gestalt” from auditory information and from printed material to improve their comprehension. I have been using this app at the Word Imaging and Sentence Imaging stages. As we work on images and sentences we are able to use this app to create virtually any sentence on the fly.  For example we were working on the known noun “Christmas tree” and created a sentence “The girl is decorating the Christmas tree.”  Naturally when asked what does this make you picture? my client simply repeated the sentence back to me without being able to actually visualize what the sentence meant to him. So in comes PicCollage to the rescue. Within in a few minutes we had this picture visualized as he explained each portion of the picture to me.

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Notability $1.99 on Sale Now!

I originally got this app to use during conferences and workshops because you can upload handouts and write or record voice directly onto them. You are able to integrate handwriting with typing and recording to make taking notes easy. This app can also be used on the fly. I recently started working with a client that had moved out-of-state and only comes to the clinic while she is in town visiting. We were focusing on her /r/ sound and since she would only be seeing me for  a short period I wanted something that she could take with her back home. Using Notability we typed and drew on the screen as we discussed the type of approach we were going to use to work on her /r/ sound.  We then took some pictures of her tongue placement to remind her of what good and not so good placement looks like.   I then printed it out and sent it home with her.20130226-211032.jpg

snakey

What did Snakey eat?  is one of  my favorite apps right now. The purpose of the game is to figure out what Snakey ate. I love it because its very simple but you can use it to target a variety of areas. It can be used to answer yes/no questions, question formation, problems solving skills, and categories.  For $.99  this is a hands down must buy!

 Yes/No Questions

Have the child answer the questions did Snake eat the sea horse, yes or no?

Question Formulation

1) What did Snakey eat?

2) Snakey did you eat the ______

3) Snakey why did you eat the _____?

4) Snakey where did you eat the ______?

5) Snakey when did you eat the ____?

6) Snakey how did you eat the _______?

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Inferencing skills

With this task the child has to evaluate the size and shape of the item in Snakey’s stomach and then compare it the the items in the skunk’s thought bubble. This will offer a variety of opportunities to work on both inferences as well as describing skills. What also is nice about the app is that you are able to pause it before your 3 selections pop up. I am not sure if this is intentional or is a bug in the game but its quite helpful.

Photo Skitch Document

Categories 

Snakey eats many different objects throughout the game, all of which fall into the categories of: animals (jungle, zoo, ocean etc..), vehicles, instruments, food, clothes, and tools. So you can see the wonderful opportunity you have to work on sorting and identifying categories!!

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What did Snakey eat? The Card Game

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I created a simple card game to be used while playing with the app. The cards can be used to make predictions on what Snakey will eat next, to make matches to what Snakey did eat, or to play a game of memory after you finish playing with the app. The cards are pretty open ended so you can work them into whatever you wish. There is also a Bingo board attached just use the cards and place them on the board. Have fun and be creative!  The cards are in a .pdf file you just need to print with your printer’s “print on both sides” option.

 Download the game here –> Snakey Card Game

Hopefully most of you found my Halloween Edition of Appdapted very useful. I really wanted to do a thanksgiving one but honestly there were only a few apps out for Turkey Day and most involved hunting turkey, not a good therapy activity. We have now moved into the Holiday Season so take a look at some great apps to use in therapy. A good majority focus around Christmas. I tried my best to find some relevant Hanukkah or Kwanza ones with very little success.

I have lots to share so keep an eye on this post as I will be updating it regularly. For now start off with these awesome apps that will keep your kids motivated!

Updated 11/27/12

Snow Doodle– $.99  Buy it Now!

Snow Doodle is the latest addition to the Doodle family by Shoe the Goose. This app has tons of potential and was released just in time for the winter season.  You have the ability to not only build “snow people” ( Have to be politically correct here, not all snow beings are men after all) but also build things using your imagination and tools like a pail, castle block, coffee cup, or a tube. Just tap the tool and out pops the snow. You can also use the free form tool and manipulate the snow ball into any design you want. This app has tons of potential and with the ability to import anything from your photo roll you can Appdapt it into any speech or language activity.

Built using the Pail tool

Turn your designs into a puzzle

Why is the Snowman scared??

Toca Hair Salon: Christmas Gift Free Highly Recommended

This is an obvious gem when looking for a Christmas app to target therapy goals. You have the option to cut Santa’s hair! I mean who wouldn’t want to have fun doing that. There is also a Christmas tree option where you can trim and decorate the tree. Target all the goals you would with Toca Hair Salon but throw in some fun Christmas Vocabulary!

Gift-Wrap-AppFree My Favorite!! Download now!

I searched and searched for an App like this hoping it existed and it does it does!! This app has such a simple premise you will be taking every therapy goal and targeting it with this app. You take a picture , pick the gift wrap, and unwrap them! Target articulation, language, or pretty much anything. I would download pictures of popular toys this year and wrap them up. Have your clients describe what the toys do or how you would play with them. In the example below I used an action picture “drinking”.

Santa’s Magice Phone-DeluxeFree and Fun

PERSONALIZE certain calls by recording your voice, and we will disguise your voice as Milo, Santa’s Elf! Santa will then ask Milo a question during the call, and Milo will bring details into the phone call that your child would never have imagined! “Wow Mommy! How did Santa know I was polite with little Johnny?” Receive the call at your choosing for the ultimate reaction. You can select from numerous Naughty or Nice prerecorded messages, such as Good Job Being Polite, Eating Well, Sharing, You’re Off the Naughty List!, Not Listening, and many more!

Christmas House DecorationFree iOS

In this app its all in the name. You decorate the exterior of a house for Christmas. This will work great as a motivator, following directions,  or for tasks requiring knowledge of spatial concepts. Decorations include snowmen, trees, Santa, lights, etc..  Endless possibilities for a creative child or therapist!

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Chanukah DreidelFree 

This is one of the few apps that I found that incorporates Chanukah . It’s  a virtual dreidel so not so exciting but could be a proper motivator for those clients of yours that celebrate Chanukah.

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Peekaboo Presents-  $1.99  iOS and Android

Here is a another solid app by Night & Day studios, developers in the ever popular Peekaboo series. I featured there Peekaboo Trick-or-Treat app in my Halloween Post. To play the app you tap on the present that is under the christmas tree  shaking and making noise. The child must make a guess on what is inside the present based on the noise it is making. Lot’s of fun presents to open and noises to guess! Have fun with this one.

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Toys “R” Us Toy FinderFree

I have been using this app to help create my client’s wish list for their holiday presents. You are able to make a profile for a child and then save their list of toys. This app would work well in a group setting to foster some good conversation about what the children have selected and why they made those selections. Also offers a good opportunity to explain what a toy does and what it looks like. Ever have that child that suffers from word retrieval difficulties and is trying to explain a toy that they play with daily but they don’t know the name? Well have them search by  the  toy categories, etc.. to help them narrow it down.

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Remember to keep a an eye on this post as there will be new apps being added throughout the next month! Have fun !!


Updated List 10/21/12 10 Days till Halloween

Halloween is going to be here before we know it, so spend some time now and stock up on some great quality Halloween themed apps!  I have always enjoyed working on Halloween themed activities throughout the month of October and I now really enjoy having my clients  interact with Halloween themed apps. I know some you school SLPs out there aren’t allowed to call these activities “Halloween themed” and usually have to go with “Fall Festival” or use some other workaround title.

Here is a list, in no particular order, of 21 Apps to use for Halloween. Some of them have a direct Halloween theme and others are themed around  spooky or scary things. Keep an eye out for the apps that are labeled HIGHLY RECOMMENDED, as these will be of immediate use to you in your therapy sessions.

Screen shot of my Halloween folder

1) Halloween Shelf   – Free  (5 years and up)

This is a fun little app that is essentially a soundboard. You can use it for cause and effect, predicting, etc… My favorite us of it and do this with other sound board apps is to use it for sound effects.   I have some of my higher functioning clients write a scary story and then read it and use the soundboard like an “old timey” radio show. They really enjoy hitting the sound effects and then listening to a recording of their story.

2) iBlower Series: Magic Halloween – Free (Toddler and up)  HIGHLY RECOMMENDED 

This is pretty cool cause and effect app because you are able to activate the animations using your hands, voice, or by blowing into the mic. The blowing into the mic feature is neat because you can have some lower functioning kiddos interacting with the app as well or even higher functioning if you want to work on some production of lip rounding or just work on basic imitation skills.

3) Monster Mash Lite Free (Toddler and Up)

Working on describing skills? This app allows you to create monsters with a different head, torso, and legs. This can be a fun app to use in a barrier type game, where the child creates their monster and the therapist has to then draw the monster based on the child’s description of it.

4) Monster Booth Free ( Middle School and Up)

This app is definitely for the older kids as it is slightly gross and contains aspects of blood and gore. You take a picture of the person you want to turn into a monster and then apply the overlays. Perhaps you can turn it into a what do you want to before Halloween game? So if you have some older middle school students and above this might be a great app to use if they can handle it without laughing and not being mature.

5) Treat Street $.99 ( Toddler and UpHIGHLY RECOMMENDED 

This is a fabulous app if you want to work on role-playing skills or just practice saying “trick or treat”. To play, you dress your character up in their costume and then head out down your street ringing the door bell or knocking on the door. The door opens and you get a treat for your bag. You are also able to monitor the treats in your bag as you go along in the game and can practice sorting skills at the end of the game by sorting all the treats in the bag.

6)  Carve-A-Pumpkin from Parents MagazineFree (Toddler and up)  HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

The app store as a bunch of carver your own pumpkin apps but I like this one the best. You are able to carve both free hand or use templates .

7) Monster Me Free ( Toddler and Up)

Monster Me is a pretty cool Augmented Reality App that has a mad scientist feel to it.  You line up your head on-screen with the guidelines and click play and virtual mask is overlay-ed over your face.  You can change your eyes, nose, and mouth while wearing the mask or have fun and click randomized for a totally mad creation!!!

8) Ask Ya Mummy Free  ( Elementary and up)

Working on answering “yes” and “no” questions? Is it boring  and tedious? Well invite a Mummy into your therapy session.  Ask Ya Mummy randomly answers questions you ask with a “yes” or a “no”. You can have fun by have the child gauge if the mummy was ”right” or “wrong” when answering the question.  The app can also be used as a soundboard as well.

9) Peek a boo Trick or Treat $1.99 (Toddler) iPad, iPhone, Nook, Kindle, Android  HIGHLY RECOMMENDED 

Night and Day studios have a fun series of Peek A Boo apps and this is their latest edition.  Knocking on the door causes it to open revealing 1 of 14 Halloween themed characters. The only thing I don’t really like is the fact that you are knocking on the door and finding a character and it should really be the other way around. You should be answering the door to greet one of the characters. It’s cute and fun nonetheless!

10) My Monster Voice Free  (Toddler and Up)  iPad

Want to sound like a monster?  This app comes with 3 preset high pitch monsters, 2 low pitch monsters, and a custom setting.  Select your monster, record your message, and hit play and start laughing at how silly the voice sounds.

11) Go Away Big Green Monster! $2.99 ( Toddler and Up)  iPad HIGHLY RECOMMENDED 

I am sure you have used this at some point with a felt board activity or just reading the book, as this book as been around for quite some time. It offers a treasure trove of possible activities from just working on the word “go”, parts of the face,  to describing activities.  Just Google “Go Away Big Green Monster! activities” and you’ll see what I mean.

12) Halloween Card Creator- Free (Elementary and up)  iPad

A fun free app that allows you to make Halloween Cards! Lots of fonts, clip art, and various other customizations  Start creating your Halloween card today and share it via e-mail or Facebook!

13) What was I scared of?  By Dr Seuss $1.99 (Elementary and up) HIGHLY RECOMMENDED 

A fun story about “fear” and how to handle it.  Typical Dr. Seuss rhyming pattern through the book supports good phonemic awareness.  Great to work on picture and word associations as well.

14) Spooky Playtime $2.99 (Toddler and Up) HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!!

This is one of my favorite Halloween apps. It has lots of fun mini games!! They include: Junk Food Zombie- feed the zombies and help improve their eating habits, Bat Cave- sound recognition, Haunted House- a memory and matching game, Pumpkin Patch- counting skills, Spooky Forest- candy shape and color matching, Billy Bones- fine motor and shape recognition, Sylvia’s Spider Web- letter andnumber recognition.

15) First Words Halloween $1.99 (Pre-k and up) HIGHLY RECOMMENDED 

This app is based on the successful First Words Apps. I like this app because you can work by letter name or phonics and pre-select the amount of letters you want in each word. It’s useful to target CVC word for articulation or simply target some fall themed vocabulary!

16) Clicky Stick Halloween $.99 (Toddler and Up) iPad  HIGHLY RECOMMENDED 

This app is based on the award-winning app Clicky Sticky. This app will allow you to create a visual scene using “stickers” and then animate it using the play button. It’s lots of fun and can be used to enhance describing and vocabulary skills.


UPDATED APPS !!

 

17)  Guess Who I am!  Halloween Monsters Edition– Free HIGHLY RECOMMENDED 

This is a fun twist on the classic Guess Who but with monsters. What’s nice is that the app offers the options of what questions to ask like ” Does your monster have wings?” etc.. So works great if you are working on asking questions or describing skills!  These prompts are also available for the regular version of Guess Who I am where people are involved.

18) Mystery Machine- Lite -Free  iPad HIGHLY RECOMMENDED 

 

This app is lots of fun. You essentially are a Mad Scientist who has created a mystery machine that creates all sorts of gross things and monsters. You have different ingredients you add to the machine three at a time and what you get is a mystery!  I can see this game being used for targeting working memory where you give the child a recipe i.e.  Eye ball, Frog, and Pumpkin and they have to remember it.

19) Mask Doodle– $.99 iPhone and iPad

This app is developed by the same developers that brought you Cookie Doodle which is another fun app. What cool about this app is that once you create your mask you are able to print it out. You can even target some fine motor by having the child cut out the mask.

20) Mask Jumble– $.99 iPhone and iPad

Here is another mask making app but this time the fun is not printing it out like in Mask Doodle but by using augmented reality to wear your mask. I use their other mask game called Mask Jumble Animals that has a free and paid version in case you wanted to check out how the app works.  Lots of fun possibilities for describing or role playing with this one!

21) Henry’ s Spooky Headlamp– $.99  iPad

 

Another fun app for building Halloween vocabulary and based on the Henry’s Headlamp series. You play as Henry wearing his headlamp in the dark and you have to search the darkness with your lamp for items like a skeleton, bat, pumpkin, etc…

 

I hope you enjoyed the updated list and that you find these apps useful for therapy!  Thanks!

Appdapted:  Zooburst 3D Pop-up Books

Zooburst is the latest in digital storytelling! It allows you to create free 3D pop-up books and share them online with others.  To create or read the books you must first register for a free account at Zooburst.com. It’s web-based so you will need a computer  with a web browser and Adobe Flash. Once you have set up your account you can then start creating or reading 3D pop-up books on your computer or iPad! When creating a book you have to login to your account on the website, click on New Book, and start creating!

The Book Builder on ZooBurst has over 10,000 searchable items that you can add to your books, plus the ability to import your own pictures. In premium mode you can add your own voice and sound effects too! To check out the pricing scheme and see the difference between free, premium, and school accounts click here —>Pricing

When you create your book there are a few ways you can read them: right from the website, using your computer’s webcam with a printed book code, or on your iPad.

When using the iPad you have a few options:

Story Codes:

Story codes are QR code esque and you use your Zooburst app in camera mode to scan it. The book attached to the code will magically pop up and you can start reading.

Book Viewer

The  iPad app Zooburst lets you view any 3D pop-up book in 2 modes.  You can use  Screen mode to interact with the book by tapping on any of the characters that have an exclamation point over their head. You can  navigate from page to page using the arrow buttons on either side of the book or by making gestures. In camera mode you use your printed story codes as shown above.

So how did I Appdapt Zooburst? Using the webcreation tool on zooburst.com I created a book called Ape’s Final /p/ Minimal Pair Adventure which focuses on final /p/ and uses minimal pairs. If you are unfamiliar with minimal pairs they are pairs of words where one competent is different, in this case they are words with and without the final /p/ sound.

The story includes these pairs of words:

  • beep-bee
  • soup-sue
  • rope-row
  • hoop-who
  • hop- ha
  • cap- ca
  • soap-so
  • nap-nah
  • pup-puh

Want to read Ape’s Final /p/ Minimal Pair Adventure or use it for therapy?

Download the Zooburst app and use the camera mode to scan the Store code below:

If you prefer to use your computer and check it out right now click on the picture below.

You wouldn’t really call me a captain of Pindustry, or one of the Pindustrialists of the Pindustrial Revolution, and I wouldn’t be considered  a source of Pinspiration. I would like to think of my self as a unique Pindivudal.  Okay I’ll stop I’ll stop I promise, hmm   maybe just one more?  I am not a source of Pindigestion.  If you’re not on Pinterest yet you really should be considering it has opened it’s doors to everyone. So it’s pretty much Pinevitable that you’ll be pinning soon.

I am not a hardcore Pinner by any means as Pinterest is really geared more toward women. Case in point, here is a  picture of what I see when I log into Pinterest. I know very manly.  It’s because I only follow women!

What I have found Pinterest useful for is somewhat different from how I see other SLPs utilizing it. For the most part Pinterest is used for collecting all your ideas,pictures, inspirations, etc… on your favorite topic and creating a virtual bulletin board of sorts. So it works well for all those crafty SLPs always wanting to create the next cool activity or just keep your cool ideas in one place. Which is totally fine if you have the time allotted to make these activities or have insomnia and have some extra time in your day ;). Here is an example of what I have found a  typical SLP board looks like. You can see the pins are  made up of: links to blogs, links to activities, links to checklists, examples of games etc…

I  have started to use Pinterest a bit differently. I am using it as a giant bulletin board for ‘flash cards’. I have been experimenting with creating phoneme boards as well as a figurative language board. Here is a link and an example of my Idioms and Figurative Language Board:

Once the board is created I then use a free app called Bazaart. Using this app you are able to make some pretty cool mash-ups (Bazaart calls them “restylings” ). What is really neat about Bazaart is that you can select anyone’s profile and do a ‘restyling’ of their pins. Simply type in their Pinterest user name and it brings up all of their boards. Here are a couple of examples of boards I made using Bazaart.

/str/ words mash-up

Final /p/ words mash-up

What’s even cooler than your basic sound board mash-ups are boards where you can create your own visual scene! What I recommend for you to do if you do want to make your own visual scenes, is to go to images.google.com and search for pictures with white backgrounds. The white backgrounds will make it much easier to crop the background out and place into your scene.  You can use these scenes for articulation, fluency, expressive language, written expression, and the list goes on.  Here is a basic example of a visual scene I created using Bazaart. I have titled it ” A Bad Day in the Neighborhood”.

For this scene I searched ‘city street’ as well as ‘superman’, ‘red car’, ‘stapler’, and ‘big bird’ with white backgrounds. The white backgrounds makes the cropping a cleaner process.

If you are ambitious you can  then take your visual scene and use it with another free app called WriteYourCap, which allows you to write a caption and overlay it over your scene. You can also use this with some of the pins on my Idioms and Figurative Language Board.

I hope you have found this a Pinteresting post and if you have any questions always feel free to e-mail me or make a comment.

Augmented Reality (AR) 

If you follow my blog, and I hope that you do, you have noticed that I have been playing around with Augmented Reality and using it in therapy. Wikipedia defines AR as :

“Augmented reality (AR) is a live, direct or indirect, view of a physical, real-world environment whose elements are augmented by computer-generated sensory input such as sound, video, graphics or GPS data. It is related to a more general concept called mediated reality, in which a view of reality is modified (possibly even diminished rather than augmented) by a computer. As a result, the technology functions by enhancing one’s current perception of reality. By contrast, virtual reality replaces the real world with a simulated one.”

This territory isn’t new and if you follow Speech Techie’s  blog you can see he did a wonderful 8-part post on QR codes and their use in therapy.  In a recent post of mine I used a Spider-Man AR  app to have fun with clean up time and to Appdapt various flash card activities.  This leads me to a pretty awesome app called Aurasma (available for both the app store and google play). Aurasma was just featured in a TED Talk. If you didn’t catch it check it out:

As you can see the premise of Aurasma is fairly simple as you can turn any thing you see with a smart phone or tablet into AR and have a  picture/video overlayed live. I believe the potential uses of this app are endless and if you are a crafty app developer you can even take their API and include it in a therapy app. Hmmm… that really makes you think of how you can use this in therapy right??  Well have no fear I have come up with a few ideas for you!!





Not as tech savvy as me? Well stay tuned for Part 2 where I’ll be explaining the “how to” on making some basic AR using Aurasma. As always, I would love to hear some feedback! So please comment and post some questions if you have them!

Aunt Maggie’s Recipe

Aunt Maggie’s Recipe ($2.99 by Inclusive Technologies) is described as an app where you can “Brew your own potion with Aunty Maggie. First choose a character then ingredients to add to the cauldron to see what effect your potion has! Small targets and multiple choices make this activity suitable those wanting to practice touch accuracy or learn to make choices. Also with switch access.”  Here is a video demoing the app:

The app is pretty basic as it is limited to just picking a potion, adding it to the cauldron, and having your character drink it.  But, there are so many things you can do with this app.

  1.  Work on pronouns! There are two girls and two boys. So you can target he,she, his,him, her, etc…
  2. Following directions. First put in the blue potion then put in the red potion or Before you put in the green potion put in the yellow.
  3. Use it as a token board.  Have your student put one drop of each color in and when they have completed their work they are then allowed to have their character drink the potion. That makes it rewarding!
  4. Learning cause and effect. Have your student explore the app and see what happens when they tap each potion and then tap the cup.
  5. Color discrimination.  Lots of possibilities here!
  6. Teaching scanning to students using AAC.  A bluetooth accessible switch interface would be needed, you can find these at RJ Cooper’s or AbleNet’s websites.
  7. Predicting. Will it turn into a blue monster or a green monster?

So there are 7 quick and easy ways to Appdapt this App to use in therapy. Those are all examples of ways to just use the app but that can get boring, so I with a the help of some screen shots I turned the app into a  board game (pictured below).  The rules are up to you! The way I play goes like this : The kids in the app become the character pieces you move across the board and the basic goal is the get all five potions first. You do this by moving around the game board and placing a chip/penny on one of the colors you landed on.  The first to get all five gets to have their character drink for the cauldron. The student then will pick the monster card that matches the monster they turned into. Whoever gets the most monsters wins! Pretty simple and straight forward but you can add or subtract from those rules, they are up to you.

A game board made using Custom Boards

Click on the links below to make your game board today! (They are *.pdf files created with Smarty Ear’s Custom Boards)

1) Character Pieces-auntmaggies_children

2) Game Board-auntmaggies_gameboard

3) Potion Strip- auntmaggies_potions

4) Monster Cards-auntmaggies_monsters

 

Have Fun and Enjoy!  Please post some comments below if you like what you see and want more 🙂

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