Tag Archive: Speech Therapy


20130527-143937.jpg

 

Pic-A-Boo is a free app by Pic-A-Boo Baby that offers a fun twist on peek-a-boo. At first glance this app is inline with other similar peek-a-boo apps out there like the Peek-a-Boo series by Night & Day Studios. The premise of Pic-A-Boo is simple, you tap on the screen and you reveal the object hiding behind the hands, barn door, blanket, or doll house.

 

20130527-143946.jpg

The game comes free with Cute Animals and Happy Robots to play pic-a-boo with. The remaining pictures are available as a in-app purchase of $1.99 and include over 40   images in 6 different sets of fun peekaboo games including farm and zoo animals with real sounds, illustrated eggs in a variety of uniforms, happy robots, illustrated animals and sweet stars.

20130527-144117.jpg

 

The best part of the app, which is included as part of the in-app purchases, is the ability to import your own and create your own “Boos”. With the ability to import your own pictures you are free to change it up a bit and target pronouns by adding pictures of yourself , family members, and the child as well as working on things like verbs or articulation.

20130527-143957.jpg                                                                                          20130527-144004.jpg

The ability to record your voice is somewhat limited as you are only able to record the sound that plays each time the object that is hiding is revealed which could be fun for younger children.

Pictured below are some examples of some  CVC words to play a  fun game of Pic-A-Boo!!

20130527-144018.jpg

20130527-144028.jpg

Pic-A-Boo is available for iPad

 

Speech Therapy on the Fly

Sorry for the delay between posts! I figured the last week of February would be as good a time as any for my first post of 2013, so without further ado here is:  Speech Therapy on the Fly

20130226-225326.jpg

The use of apps have made the lives of speech-language pathologists and special educators around the world much easier. Well unless you have a parent hand you an iPad and say please program my child’s AAC app, depending on who you are you might run in the other direction! New apps are released daily and it’s almost impossible to keep track of them, heck it’s almost impossible to keep track of the apps I have on my iPad. We really need something better than a “folder” that holds only 20 apps don’t you think ?? Anyway let me get to the point of this post! I have been using a few apps lately that allow me to create on the fly and go with the flow of  some of my moody clients or Appdapt with another app or to a pen and paper type program. Here are 3  great examples:

Puppet Pals HD Directors Pass  $2.99 in the App store available for iPhone and iPad

Puppet Pals as been around a while and there is actually a Puppet Pals 2 that came out recently, however I still prefer the first version because you are able to use your whole body in the scene whereas Puppet Pals 2 you are only capable of using your head.  So with this app you can quickly add a background scene and place virtually any characters in your scene.  You then record your scene by moving your character around as the app records your voice and your character’s movements. You can see by the picture below  that my client is really into dinosaur and enjoyed making the dinosaur eat him.

Director's Pass allows you to take pictures from your photo roll and narrate a "play" about them.

Director’s Pass allows you to take pictures from your photo roll and narrate a “play” about them.

PicCollage – free for iPhone and iPad

PicCollage is a fabulous app that has lots of applications for therapy. The purpose of this app is to create collages using pictures from your camera roll and the web.  The web search on this app is one of the most useful features you can literally add anything that comes to a client’s mind and instantly crop and add it to the collage.

20130226-220357.jpg

The picture above is the start screen when opening PicCollage. You can see the options included which are: capturing a picture, adding a photo, photo from web, adding text, and adding stickers. Some stickers like hats or sunglasses are free but most you have to purchase. I quickly started using this app to pair with other apps. For example I have been using Rainbow Sentences by Mobile Education Store to focus on sentence structure with some of my clients. While using the Rainbow Sentences App I take screenshots of some of the sentences my clients were successful with and then use the screenshots in PicCollage. Here is an example:

20130226-211122.jpg

 As you can see the screen shot is the background image from Rainbow Sentences. I took a picture of my client, cropped her body out and inserted it into the collage. I then searched for roller skates and a helmet having my client request the type that she wanted. These were then cropped and placed on the picture to give the illusion that she is wearing skates and a helmet. Finally I searched for word bubbles and inserted that in as well with the text.  So I was able to seamlessly transition to another activity but still working on the previous goals all while keeping my client motivated by having her personalize the picture.

Another use for PicCollage is with my older clients that I am using Nanci Bell’s  Verbalizing and Visualizing. If you are unfamiliar with the program I recommend that you check it out. It focuses on having children create a whole image or a “gestalt” from auditory information and from printed material to improve their comprehension. I have been using this app at the Word Imaging and Sentence Imaging stages. As we work on images and sentences we are able to use this app to create virtually any sentence on the fly.  For example we were working on the known noun “Christmas tree” and created a sentence “The girl is decorating the Christmas tree.”  Naturally when asked what does this make you picture? my client simply repeated the sentence back to me without being able to actually visualize what the sentence meant to him. So in comes PicCollage to the rescue. Within in a few minutes we had this picture visualized as he explained each portion of the picture to me.

20130226-211150.jpg

Notability $1.99 on Sale Now!

I originally got this app to use during conferences and workshops because you can upload handouts and write or record voice directly onto them. You are able to integrate handwriting with typing and recording to make taking notes easy. This app can also be used on the fly. I recently started working with a client that had moved out-of-state and only comes to the clinic while she is in town visiting. We were focusing on her /r/ sound and since she would only be seeing me for  a short period I wanted something that she could take with her back home. Using Notability we typed and drew on the screen as we discussed the type of approach we were going to use to work on her /r/ sound.  We then took some pictures of her tongue placement to remind her of what good and not so good placement looks like.   I then printed it out and sent it home with her.20130226-211032.jpg

Hopefully most of you found my Halloween Edition of Appdapted very useful. I really wanted to do a thanksgiving one but honestly there were only a few apps out for Turkey Day and most involved hunting turkey, not a good therapy activity. We have now moved into the Holiday Season so take a look at some great apps to use in therapy. A good majority focus around Christmas. I tried my best to find some relevant Hanukkah or Kwanza ones with very little success.

I have lots to share so keep an eye on this post as I will be updating it regularly. For now start off with these awesome apps that will keep your kids motivated!

Updated 11/27/12

Snow Doodle– $.99  Buy it Now!

Snow Doodle is the latest addition to the Doodle family by Shoe the Goose. This app has tons of potential and was released just in time for the winter season.  You have the ability to not only build “snow people” ( Have to be politically correct here, not all snow beings are men after all) but also build things using your imagination and tools like a pail, castle block, coffee cup, or a tube. Just tap the tool and out pops the snow. You can also use the free form tool and manipulate the snow ball into any design you want. This app has tons of potential and with the ability to import anything from your photo roll you can Appdapt it into any speech or language activity.

Built using the Pail tool

Turn your designs into a puzzle

Why is the Snowman scared??

Toca Hair Salon: Christmas Gift Free Highly Recommended

This is an obvious gem when looking for a Christmas app to target therapy goals. You have the option to cut Santa’s hair! I mean who wouldn’t want to have fun doing that. There is also a Christmas tree option where you can trim and decorate the tree. Target all the goals you would with Toca Hair Salon but throw in some fun Christmas Vocabulary!

Gift-Wrap-AppFree My Favorite!! Download now!

I searched and searched for an App like this hoping it existed and it does it does!! This app has such a simple premise you will be taking every therapy goal and targeting it with this app. You take a picture , pick the gift wrap, and unwrap them! Target articulation, language, or pretty much anything. I would download pictures of popular toys this year and wrap them up. Have your clients describe what the toys do or how you would play with them. In the example below I used an action picture “drinking”.

Santa’s Magice Phone-DeluxeFree and Fun

PERSONALIZE certain calls by recording your voice, and we will disguise your voice as Milo, Santa’s Elf! Santa will then ask Milo a question during the call, and Milo will bring details into the phone call that your child would never have imagined! “Wow Mommy! How did Santa know I was polite with little Johnny?” Receive the call at your choosing for the ultimate reaction. You can select from numerous Naughty or Nice prerecorded messages, such as Good Job Being Polite, Eating Well, Sharing, You’re Off the Naughty List!, Not Listening, and many more!

Christmas House DecorationFree iOS

In this app its all in the name. You decorate the exterior of a house for Christmas. This will work great as a motivator, following directions,  or for tasks requiring knowledge of spatial concepts. Decorations include snowmen, trees, Santa, lights, etc..  Endless possibilities for a creative child or therapist!

20121126-214344.jpg

Chanukah DreidelFree 

This is one of the few apps that I found that incorporates Chanukah . It’s  a virtual dreidel so not so exciting but could be a proper motivator for those clients of yours that celebrate Chanukah.

20121126-214355.jpg

Peekaboo Presents-  $1.99  iOS and Android

Here is a another solid app by Night & Day studios, developers in the ever popular Peekaboo series. I featured there Peekaboo Trick-or-Treat app in my Halloween Post. To play the app you tap on the present that is under the christmas tree  shaking and making noise. The child must make a guess on what is inside the present based on the noise it is making. Lot’s of fun presents to open and noises to guess! Have fun with this one.

20121126-214410.jpg

20121126-214421.jpg

20121126-214438.jpg

Toys “R” Us Toy FinderFree

I have been using this app to help create my client’s wish list for their holiday presents. You are able to make a profile for a child and then save their list of toys. This app would work well in a group setting to foster some good conversation about what the children have selected and why they made those selections. Also offers a good opportunity to explain what a toy does and what it looks like. Ever have that child that suffers from word retrieval difficulties and is trying to explain a toy that they play with daily but they don’t know the name? Well have them search by  the  toy categories, etc.. to help them narrow it down.

20121126-214502.jpg

20121126-214515.jpg

Remember to keep a an eye on this post as there will be new apps being added throughout the next month! Have fun !!

Halloween App Giveaway!

My recent post on Appdapted: Halloween Themed Apps was a tremendous success. Thank you to all my followers as well as a big thanks to those of you that re-posted it on twitter, Facebook, Pinterest , and their own blogs. A few of the developers that I posted about saw the post  and were happy to offer apps for a giveaway.

is offering copies of First Words Halloween.

was nice enough to offer copies of three of their awesome titles. These titles include:

To Enter the Giveaway Simply:

1) Comment on what app you would like and why

2) Re-post, share, tweet, or pin the link to the giveaway

Appdapted: Halloween Candy!!

Halloween is a great time of year to work on a variety of language enhancing activities, hence my last past of the top Halloween apps to use in therapy. Be it simple describing of costumes to spooky narratives there are many goals that can be targeted while using the Halloween theme. Below are two cool apps that can be incorporated to focus on such concepts as Colors and Numbers (quantity).  You can include them into your Halloween candy sorting routine! They also do not have to be limited to Halloween activities and can be incorporated into any type of sorting or counting activities.

Color Me PeteColor Me Pete - Lesia Design

Color Me Pete is an augmented reality coloring book app. The premise is that colors have gone missing from Pete’s coloring page and you have to go search for them. You search for them by finding like colored objects and holding them up to the camera on your iOS device. You tap on the object and you can use that color to “recolor” Pete on his coloring page. This app is fun to create a scavenger hunt game during your therapy session or for basic color discrimination. In the paid version there is an easy and difficulty mode included.  The easy mode pictured below gives you the word and color prompt when asking ” Find me Yellow” etc… and the difficult mode takes away these prompts. Find the colors: Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Purple, Pink, Brown, Gray and Black. ( The lite version only offers 3 colors).

 You can use this app to sort through your Halloween candy and work on identifying colors of the different wrappers 🙂

20121015-221305.jpg

20121015-221314.jpg

20121015-221325.jpg

Flexible CounterFlexible Counter HD - Michael Devore
Flexible Counter will be fun to use when counting your candy.  It  supports up to  8 counters with user-selected images, label text, and colors. So you can decide on counting your candy by color or go ahead and take pictures of the candy, like in the example below, and see how many of your favorites you have. Save and load up to 5 different layouts. It works in either portrait or landscape mode.

20121015-221342.jpg

Voice Recognition & Activation Apps for Speech Therapy

Voice recognition and activation have been slowly made it into the main stream with advancements like Siri, S Voice, or even Dragon Naturally Speaking. These features are also making their way into apps and I am not talking about apps like Talking Tom, Talking Ben, or Talking Ava as these are simple record and say apps. These record and say apps are useful especially with children that are reluctant to vocalize or just too stubborn. What I am talking about is using your voice, words, or phrases to activate the app or cause something on the screen to happen in response to a “recognized” word or sound. Some of these apps are voice activation apps and some are voice recognition apps.

Tiga Talk Camp Fire Adventure- $4.99

This app, based around characters of a Canadian TV show, appears to be a much improved version of the first Tiga Talk app which I have to say I was not a fan of. I wasn’t a fan of the first app because it put too much emphasis on the phoneme and then adding a ‘uh’ to the end. If you are a phonology person you know this is a ‘no no’. The premise of this app is that all the animal’s voices were stolen and you have to help them get their voices back by telling them. The developers have done a much better job this time around and have made it very fun and interactive working on 18 phonemes each with a different animal “voice”. The recognition software appears to be pretty accurate but they are up front with the disclaimer: “Gameplay rewards are based entirely on participation, not accuracy, so the child is constantly getting positive feedback as long as they are trying to make sounds!”. I am glad that they make this disclaimer because in the hands of a parent this would be a very useful app. There are other nice features to turn on and off such as on screen items to tap like acorns for the squirrel etc.. I did find it weird that some of the characters appear to be standing in mid- air during some of the scenes, which hopefully is an easy fix for the developers. So keeping in mind proper sound production and elicitation techniques a great therapist will find this app handy, especially if you are working on some early approximations.

Monkey Thinks-Free

This app has a really super simple premise. There is a monkey on screen with a thought bubble and the user has to say what it is. The voice recognition analyzes it and tells you if you’re correct or incorrect. MonkeyThinks uses the CMU Pocketsphinx library, and Politepix’s OpenEars (cmusphinx.sourceforge.net, www.politepix.com/openears/). Upon your first incorrect response and written cue will pop up on the screen. The voice recognition software is actually fairly sensitive and isn’t based on “accept any vocalization.” It’s not perfect though as it will accept “bee” for “key” and some other differences like that. This app would work best for a child working on word retrieval and expressive vocabulary and not for a child working on articulation. I have e-mailed the developer to find out how many words are in the word set as it is not listed, they also indicate that there will be more word sets coming soon.

Magic Voice-$1.99

Magic Voice, by Pocket SLP, is a voice activation app where the child use’s there voice to make something happen on the screen. There are 5 animations available in the app: a car, a balloon, a magic hat, a rocket, and a stack of blocks. Once the animation is selected the child then uses their voice to trigger the animation. There are 3 levels of difficulty I first thought this app was super sensitive to sound as it kept activating from the noise of my ceiling fan, so I went and tried it in a room without any noise in it. Once the difficulty level was selected the animations seem to start with or without sound, so I am hoping that Pocket SLP can comment on this. I was also concerned that when the app was released it was in the education category but I have now found it in the entertainment category.

PAH!-$.99

This is a fun little iphone game based on voice activation. You are the pilot of a rocket ship flying through space and you use your voice to control your ship, saying “Ahhh” to go up and “Pah” to shoot. The game is a little tricky at first to get a hang of so could be a little frustrating for younger children. This game might work best perhaps with a child that has voice goals.

Mickey Mouse Clubhouse: Road Rally An Interactive Show- Free

This is a wonderful free app put out by Disney that is an “Interactive Show”. It is based on one episode of Mickey Mouse Clubhouse called “Road Rally”. It also has a voice activation component to it where Mickey asks you a question and you have to answer. It would be really neat if it was voice recognition as well but sadly it’s not as most of the time the background music activates the voice activation areas. None the less it’s a great app that has big production value that will be great motivator for any client that’s a fan of Mickey Mouse!

EggZoo- Free

EggZoo is an app developed on the representative method for teaching language to children- Total Physical Response (TPR). I had to look this up as I thought I was crazy for having never heard of it but it is apparently a methodology for teaching second languages that involves interacting and acting out the words as you learn them. The app revolves around four egg shaped animals You learn the words: catch, hit, chase, laugh, jump, spin, smell, shake, sleep, play, eat, and fly. You interact with the characters touching items on the screen for a few turns and then it switches to saying the words. There really isn’t voice recognition as it will accept any sound to activate the character’s response. That being said it will work well for a child working on approximations to some of these words like “eat” or “play”. It’s unfortunate that most of the words have clusters in them, but they are still good words to work on expressive vocabulary.

20120916-162148.jpg

20120916-162201.jpg

20120916-162349.jpg

20120916-162357.jpg

Are you using any other voice recognition or activation apps that I have not listed?  How do you use these types of app in therapy? Comment and let me know! Thanks!

I have to admit I was pretty skeptical from the get go about Speech Buddies, but I like to welcome new technologies to the field so I was eager to see what they had to offer.  Speech Buddies are a series of  speech therapy tools, by Articulate Technologies,to help children learn correct  tongue positioning for five speech sounds. These are sounds that typically are the most difficult for some children to produce. These sounds are  – R, S, L, CH, and SH.

Speech Buddies were designed by a team of speech-language pathologists and engineers who understand the challenges associated with speech therapy and treating speech disorders.

It’s very important to note that Speech Buddies are not oral motor therapy. What they do is essentially help the child increase the kinesthetic  awareness or sensory biofeedback of  their articulators.  Here is a diagram of how they work.

 I used the Speech Buddies for about a month with clients that ranged from minor articulation errors on /l/ and /r/ to apraxia. I was pleasantly surprised by the results that I was seeing after using the Buddies for one or two sessions. I found that they worked best for clients who did not have any cognitive deficits as they were somewhat resistant to utilizing the Buddies in their mouths and for those that did tolerate it they often wanted to take the Speech Buddy from their mouth and then play therapist on me. ( Rubbing alcohol is used to sanitize between uses). Another issue I had was with missing dentition which didn’t offer the speech buddy support to cue the sound. For some of my clients who were working on one or two of these sounds they enjoyed using the Buddies on themselves and were able to instantly hear and feel the difference between their incorrect production and the production with  the Speech Buddy. Overall I would recommend using the Speech Buddies, especially if you are a therapist that treats a caseload filled with clients with poor speech intelligibility.

                                                                                                       

The Language Fix

A blog for sharing language and learning information

The Sensory Spectrum

For SPD Kiddos and Their Parents

Bowen Speech Blog

A blog focused on topics in speech, language, swallowing, and related disorders!

So you want to become an SLP..

A non-traditional undergraduate CSD student aspiring to become a Speech-Language Pathologist... hopefully.

Free Language Stuff

Tons of Language Activities for Specific Language Needs

Say "Ah".

Adventures in hospital based pediatric speech-language pathology

Executive Training Dubai

Training Courses in Dubai

The Speech Dudes

The Edgy Side of Speech Pathology; sharp, profane, but never dull. Sly educators.

Speech Therapists Don't Get Apples!

Android Reviews and Microsoft Office Files for SLPs

My name is autism's Blog

Networking For Answers

Live, Love, Lace

A blog about crafts, speech, recipes, and life

Glottal Enterprises

Instruments for voice measurements and speech therapy

On Sarah's iPad

A Mum's guide to Apps, eBooks, and other mobile media

The Flux Capacitor

Just another WordPress.com weblog

The Tao of Badass

Just another WordPress.com site

wishyouwereear

Just another WordPress.com site

lydiaandjane

Just another WordPress.com site

ashleylesleysd

This WordPress.com site is the cat’s pajamas

Starfish Therapies

Making a difference

Iteach2talk's Blog

Just another speech therapy site

NSSLHA

A blog by NSSLHA Students

Kendra Ped PT

Wife, mother, professor, & physical therapist specializing in pediatrics. Blogging about child development, family, PT practice, teaching, research, & life. Views are my own.

Hedgepiggle

20, Domestic Goddess, Avid Cook, LingLang Student and Aspiring Speech Therapist. Connoisseur of Fine Ciders.

Moving Towards Understanding

Just another WordPress.com weblog

%d bloggers like this: